holiness

You are Gods (John 10:31-42)

When Jesus states that He and the Father are one, his Jewish hearers want to stone Him for blasphemy. Jesus defends Himself by pointing to an obscure passage in Psalm 82 where God tells people, "you are gods.” Then Jesus challenges his hearers, "…and the Scripture cannot be broken". In this lesson we explore the unity of the Father and the Son, then tackle the meaning of the puzzling “you are gods” statement, one which has significant implications on our day-to-day living. We close the lesson by looking at the confidence Jesus had on the inspiration and integrity of the Scriptures: down to the word

The Temple of God

[Our apologies! We forgot to hit the record button today. Attached are the notes from our study.  May they serve as a starting point for your study on the Temple of God!]

In the book of 2 Samuel, God tells David that from David's seed will come a king who would build a house for God's name and establish a kingdom that would reign forever. David's son Solomon would go on to build the temple, about which much is written in the Old Testament. But was Solomon the fulfillment of this prophecy? Understanding the temple in the Old Testament provides important insight into Jesus' and the apostles' teaching, and the implications of these teachings on our lives today. 

PDF of Lesson Notes

1 Corinthians 15 (pt 2) and 16 - More on the Resurrection of the Body and Paul's Final Remarks

Paul spends an entire chapter on the resurrection of the dead. In the previous lesson, we provided an overview of chapter fifteen with its key themes. In this lesson, we dig deeper into the chapter to explore further why a correct understanding of the resurrection is so central to the Christian faith and obedience to Jesus' teachings, how an incorrect understanding can lead to worldliness in the church, and how we can use the Scriptures and reason to defend the resurrection to non-believers. This lesson concludes with the final chapter in the book of 1 Corinthians, where Paul comments on weekly collections of money for the poor, house churches, and the holy kiss. 

Does God View Our Righteousness as Filthy Rags?

Practically all Christians who have had any contact with Evangelical Protestantism know by memory Isaiah 64:6: “We have all become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous deeds are like filthy rags.” But is this really how God views the righteous acts of His people, or of mankind in general? Or, is this simply another case of a theologian (Martin Luther) taking a verse out of context?